What is Myofascia and Myofascial Release

I heard the perfect analogy for what fascia is in the body, from a structural standpoint. Take a jar and put all sorts of little things in it like golf tees, marbles, string, pencils and fill up the jar with it. Then pour in this liquid, to the brim of the jar, that will set, but remains 70 – 80% liquid (as that is what we are). When this liquid sets, it will also be very structurally strong as well as being fluid. Almost like a super-jello. So now in the jar, you have all those items listed above and poured between those spaces is this liquid that will set. When it sets, you can crack the jar and this structural jello will hold the shape of the jar with all the items listed above set within it. What the items listed above represent are our cells and to a larger scale, things like our bones, nerves, muscles, brain, arteries/veins and holds them all in the shape that is what we are.

It is an extremely strong, 3 dimensional, gelatinous web that surrounds everything in our body that allows us to move but also holds us in our shape. It is crucial that it maintains that fluid content in the same way that it is crucial that leather maintains that moistness to remain soft and flexible. If for some reason parts of our fascial system loose that fluid content, it becomes dry, it loses it’s flexibility and pliability and as the fascial system is continuous through the entire body, can affect the biomechanics through the entire body. There is never a predictable way that it can affect the body.

Fascia can lose it’s fluid content for many different reasons including trauma, surgeries (joint replacement/abdominal surgeries/child birth), inflammatory responses (IBS, Crohns,Pneumonia) and chronic longer term shortening of tissues (poor posture, sitting), microtrauma to muscle tissue from heavy activity like biking, running, weight lifting. Shortening of the fascia may have occurred recently or may have occurred as long ago as a traumatic childbirth. The body is able to compensate for where ever the fascial restriction are for a long time before the presentations may occur.

Two of the most common major presentations of fascial adhesions that I see are low back pain from adhesions occurring at the front of the pelvis/hip regions and back/shoulder/posterior neck pain occurring from adhesions forming at the front of the neck and chest area pulling the head and the shoulders forward. When you are pulled forward by fascial adhesions at the front of the body, the muscles that pull you back up (whether they be the low/mid/upper back or the back neck or shoulder muscles) become strained, fatigue and ultimately produce pain and spams.

The main mantra with this work is find the pain but look for the cause elsewhere.

In our original training, we were very symptoms oriented and it took a leap of faith to pull myself away from that to move towards this philosophy but it has been so affective. Deal with the fascial restrictions so the body can move in the manner to which it was designed to do. Just let the body move like it should. That’s what it really wants to do.

How does one release fascia back to it’s original property? That’s worth another blog entry. 🙂

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