Post Operative Myofascial Release

When a person has had surgery, whether it be abdominal, cranial, shoulder, back, hip, knee or any joint surgery, often a neglected portion of the recovery is Myofascial Release of joints and tissues affected by the surgery. Adhesions can occur in the joints or tissues as a result of the surgery itself or the period where the person has to keep themselves, or a portion of their body, immobile during the healing phase immediately after the surgery.

I became acutely aware of this necessity after my heart surgery, where I had a heart valve replaced. To do the surgery, they had to cut through my breast bone to access the heart and do the surgery.  So for the next month, I had to keep my arms and shoulders pulled forward. I wasn’t able to open up my chest and bring my arms up and stretch them back while the sternum repairs itself. As a result, all the tissues around the front of my chest, my upper abdomen and the front of my neck were put in a shortened position for an extended period of time. All the tissues in the front will become adhered to each other and keep the tissues shortened which dramatically alters the center of gravity with the body and the shoulders and neck/head are pulled in a forward position. This is just a quick example of the effects of immobilization after surgery but doesn’t include the effect of the scar tissue created by the surgery itself.

I have seen the same effects with shoulder surgery, back surgery, hip/knee/ankle surgery. A bit portion of the rehab process is the return the joint or body part back to it’s normal mobility with myofascial release and strengthening. A body just wants to move in the manner in which it’s designed to do. That’s the best way to return a body to normal. The techniques are different for scar tissue release, for soft tissue release and for release of tissue surrounding the joints like ligaments, tendons or the capsule that surrounds joint. All can shorten, but all can be returned back to a good functional range of motion.

The principals of Myofascial Release are adhered to (pardon the pun) to create an increase of mobility that is gentle, effective and creates a long term effect. Every release will last a while but it’s so important that the patient has a full understanding of how they are presenting and how they can maintain the work that we do at home. It should never be about depepnding on the therapist to “fix” you. We assess the condition, educate, we begin the process to facilitate and allow the patient to help maintain the progress with home exercises.

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