Myofascia, Tension and Stability

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During the Myofascial Release courses that I have taken, a common comparison was made between the fascia in the human body and a tent. I think it is a great example of how Fascia maintains structure, function and stability in the human body. It holds us together and allows us to move and be flexible, yet strong. The function of the skeletal system and the fascial system act like the poles of a tent and the ropes that hold up a tent. The poles are the skeletal system that create the shape of the tent but it is the importance of the tension of the ropes, which are the fascial system of the body, which maintains the integrity and holds the shape of the tent. Without the ropes, the tent, even with the poles, will fall over in the presence of an internal or external force. It is the fascia, which allows the tent to hold it’s shape and provide the function.

An example of dysfunctional fascia, which may be adhered and/or shortened would be like pulling one of the ropes too tightly. Think of the whole tent being pulled to that side. The same thing can happen with the body which adhered, shortened fascia can pull the body out of it’s center of gravity causing dysfunction, instability, weakness, reduced range of motion and pain. There are various causes of fascia that can become short, dehydrated and dysfunctional. When it comes to shortened fascia, everybody presents differently. It can begin at child birth or be present after even a minimally invasive surgery.

It’s finding the fascial restrictions that pull the body out of it’s center of gravity. The philosophy is to find the pain but look for the cause elsewhere as the cause and effect may not be in the same area. As a therapist, I’ve learned to treat without feeling that I know what it happening. There is a process, but I have to learn to be a good listener to find where the cause is.

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